Poland, Committee In Support Of Solidarity, 1982, January 8, Solidarity Information Bulletin 7

Press Advisory
Special Edition
January 8, 1982

Committee In Support Of Solidarity

"SOLIDARITY'S" INFORMATION BULLETIN, No. 7

THE DECREES OF THE STATE OF WAR IMPOSE THE DEATH PENALTY FOR STRIKING, AND HARSH PENALTIES FOR DISSEMINATING INFORMATION AND "INCITING" RESISTANCE. NEVERTHELESS, "WARSAW SOLIDARITY" HAS PUBLISHED UNDERGROUND BULLETINS CALLING FOR CONTINUED RESISTANCE AND REPORTING STRIKE ACTIONS AND OTHER FORMS OF RESISTANCE.

FOLLOWING IS A TRANSCRIPT OF "SOLIDARITY'S" INFORMATION BULLETIN, No. 7, WHICH WAS RECEIVED FROM WARSAW. THE BULLETIN WAS DATED DECEMBER 30, 1981. THE TEXT WAS TRANSLATED BY THE NEW YORK OFFICE.

COPY AND PASS ON! [THIS HAS OPENED EVERY "SOLIDARITY" INFORMATION BULLETIN.]

NEWS FROM THE COUNTRY

State of war -- a violation of the Constitution -- "According to article 33 of the Constitution, the Sejm [PARLIAMENT] of the Polish People's Republic is empowered to pass decrees instituting a state of war. According to the Constitution, imposition of the state of war occur only:

a) in case of armed attack on the Polish People's Republic; and

b) when Poland is obliged by international treaties to join in common defense against aggression." (Andrzej Burda, Polskie prawo panstowe [A TEXTBOOK ON POLISH CONSTITUTIONAL LAW], p. 277).

The Bujak Hunt

Zbigniew Bujak, the chairman of Warsaw Solidarity, is still free. The police have not succeeded in catching him. Warrants for Bujak's arrest are posted in police vans. Our benefactors from SB [SECRET POLICE] and MO [UNIFORMED POLICE] are organizing hunts for wanted persons as was done during the Nazi Occupation. Let us remember that those hunted right now by the militia are by and large Solidarity activists. Let us help them if there is a possibility of doing so.

"New people, new organization"--After the pacification of the strike in the Wroclaw factories, three enterprises in Wroclaw were dissolved. There was an announcement that on January 4th new workers will be recruited.

On the wall, in the Lublin regional headquarters of Solidarity a tablet was hung on which is written "WRZZ." [REGIONAL COUNCIL OF TRADE UNIONS--Regional bodies of the CRZZ, the official trade unions].

Eyewitness accounts--Gdansk--On December 17, 1981, in the morning, the strike in the Lenin Shipyard was broken. The tanks entered, crushing the entrance gate, and destroyed a great deal of equipment. There were fatalities. Black flags were hung over the shipyard. The newspapers said that there were 400 wounded, but the shipyard workers said that there were many, many more wounded. The tanks fired blanks and small explosives. Wednesday night I saw such an explosive tear off the arm of a boy, and wound his face so severely that he lost an eye. Another person was struck by such an explosive while standing on a roof and was killed in the fall from the roof. The ZOMO used little rocket launchers to hurl these small explosives.

Near the rail station a crowd gathered, possibly one hundred thousand strong. People were building barricades on the streets and set a police van on fire. The army was withdrawn from around the shipyard, because the soldiers had become too friendly with the workers.

For the actual assault, the ZOMO was used. There were possibly two thousand ZOMO, and at one point, they were almost crushed by the crowd. [WHICH NUMBERED AS GREAT AS ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND]. It was impossible to get off the train at the Gdansk railroad station because an armored vehicle had driven onto a platform and launched explosives [SUCH AS MENTIONED EARLIER], and also sprayed some sort of liquid and tear gas.

People said that a procession, led by a priest, entered the shipyard, and the priest was later arrested. The monument to the victims of December 1970 [WHEN WORKERS WERE KILLED IN THE STRIKES OF THAT YEAR] was cut off in all directions by a triple cordon of ZOMO. There was apparently something going on in the city. There was a lot of smoke and gas. There were fires. And shots were heard.

The background of the activities of WRONA -- We have received a report of a meeting between the top managers of the thirty largest factories in Poland and representatives of the government. We are passing on fragments of a memo from this meeting, which was sent to General Jaruzelski. [IT CAN BE ASSUMED THAT THE AUTHOR OF THE MEMO WAS A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE GOVERNMENT].

"On December 22nd, there was a conference of the top managers of the thirty largest enterprises, belonging to various branches of industry and services from the Warsaw area. From the managers it follows that:

a) in the majority of factories, there mood is depressed and distrust, expressed by posture of silence during work, and in the case of women workers, prayer during work. The crews of factories where the forces of order intervened experienced shock, but it is possible to observe among them a sobering up to reality;

b) Young people do not see any hope for improving conditions, in particular in the developmental perspectives in the form of improvement of the housing situation. This causes frustration and contestatory postures;

c) The majority of Solidarity activists believe that when the state "W" [STAN Wojenny - State of War] is lifted, it will be possible to return to the previous state of affairs. After the imposition of the state "W", the second and third echelons of union authorities revealed themselves;

d) The managerial cadre of higher rank (from the head department on upward) are largely loyal to the state; however, among the cadres of lower rank it is possible to observe serious influences of Solidarity;

e) Among the work crews, there is distrust of propaganda, especially of intrusive and clumsy propaganda. The conduct of TV reporting during the state "W" is commonly criticized;

f) In the Party apparatus and among Party activists, there is a tendency toward overeager activity and retributive actions. This leads to divisions between Party members and those who do not belong to the Party, and may create the impression that the state is able to exist only "under the cover of gun barrels.";

g) Where the law about workers' self-government already took effect, and the self-governing boards were chosen, the boards are largely controlled by Solidarity. The law of [WORKER'S] self-government creates among these boards a "comfort of power," i.e. responsibility. [In Polish, the responsibility of elected leaders to their constituents.] The most important conclusions and recommendations [ARE]: a) It is absolute] necessary to institute reform, immediately. We cannot allow the creation of a vacuum in the wake of [THE INDEPENDENT SUPPRESSION] of trade unions.

In the factories in the future, trade unions and workers self-government should be created. In the majority of the factories, however, the composition of these self-governing boards will have to he changed [TO ERADICATE SOLIDARITY'S INFLUENCE WHERE SELF-MANAGEMENT HAD BEEN ESTABLISHED] We should introduce the requirement, among others, of several year's work experience, which would eliminate a majority of Solidarity's activists. Verification of cadres [REVIEW OF PERSONNEL] is necessary; however, it must be undertaken without over-eagerness and without retributive actions. A condition of winning the trust of the workforce is: the improvement of the quality of propaganda, and conducting a dialogue with the workers [EMPLOYEE RELATIONS].

One can conclude from this report that WRON-a [MILITARY COUNCIL FOR NATIONAL SALVATION, "CROW"] wants to destroy everything that Polish society won since August 1980. It wants to liquidate workers' self-government [a law passed by the Parliament in the fall of 1981 allowed the establishment of workers' councils in enterprises or factories]; it wants to make Solidarity into a CRZZ [Central Council of Trade Unions, which was the official trade union of the government, dissolved after the creation of Solidarity]. It wants to create a situation in which workers would have no right to protest against injustice and exploitation.

END

COMMITTEE IN SUPPORT OF SOLIDARITY
275 SEVENTH AVENUE, TWENTY-FIFTH FLOOR / NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10001
(212) 989-0909 / Press: Contact (212) 929-6966
PRESS ADVISORY: SPECIAL EDITION
January 8, 1982
CONTACT: Chris Wilcock, Agnieszka Kolakowska, 929-6966

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